October 4, 2022
Spread the love

Wait until you see Fulton County…

According to election commentator Nick Moseder, those concerned about the integrity of elections have had a pretty glaring blind spot as to a vulnerability that’s deserving of much more attention – that being the voting data provided by the Edison Research Center.

While acknowledging the issues associated with bloated voter rolls, mail-in ballots, all varieties of voting machines, and ballot drop boxes, Moseder says the “Edison feed” has largely gone unnoticed in the dialogue of election integrity.

“But there’s another major piece of this election fraud puzzle, which has received very little attention up until now. And that is the Edison feed. Now, if you don’t know what the Edison feed is, the Edison Research Center is the agency used by the New York Times, NBC, CNN, and all these other major media outlets. This is where they get those live reporting numbers on election day. And according to The New York Times, this is how it works. This is how they get the live election results on election day.”

Moseder, referencing the New York Times article dubbed “How Do Election Results Work?”, quotes how The Times gathers their live election results coverage via the Associated Press and has “on-the-ground reporting by more than 4,000 correspondents who gather vote tallies from county clerks and other local officials after polls close.

The Associated Press, per The Times article, reviews the data gathered from individual states and “checks the vote totals for potential inconsistencies or errors” before sending off that data to the New York Times “and other customers about every one to three minutes.”

According to Moseder, this Edison Research Center entity at the center of much of this vote tallying where election results are handed off to the media presents enormous vulnerabilities if Edison bore “a nefarious agenda” in their reported results.

“So Edison Research is a massive agency used across all 50 states, they have 4000 people on the ground, reporting this back to Edison, and that Edison feed goes to the New York Times and all the media outlets. And so think for a second about all the centralized control that this one agency has over elections. If Edison had a nefarious agenda, that would be a really, really big problem, don’t you think?”

Moseder cut away to a video from Jeff O’Donnell, who exposed the bizarre fluctuation of votes out of Chester County, Pennsylvania, during the live results reporting from the 2020 election, telling viewers “to keep in the back of your mind, the fact that vote totals are not supposed to go down at all.”

According to election commentator Nick Moseder, those concerned about the integrity of elections have had a pretty glaring blind spot as to a vulnerability that’s deserving of much more attention – that being the voting data provided by the Edison Research Center.

While acknowledging the issues associated with bloated voter rolls, mail-in ballots, all varieties of voting machines, and ballot drop boxes, Moseder says the “Edison feed” has largely gone unnoticed in the dialogue of election integrity.

“But there’s another major piece of this election fraud puzzle, which has received very little attention up until now. And that is the Edison feed. Now, if you don’t know what the Edison feed is, the Edison Research Center is the agency used by the New York Times, NBC, CNN, and all these other major media outlets. This is where they get those live reporting numbers on election day. And according to The New York Times, this is how it works. This is how they get the live election results on election day.”

Moseder, referencing the New York Times article dubbed “How Do Election Results Work?”, quotes how The Times gathers their live election results coverage via the Associated Press and has “on-the-ground reporting by more than 4,000 correspondents who gather vote tallies from county clerks and other local officials after polls close.

The Associated Press, per The Times article, reviews the data gathered from individual states and “checks the vote totals for potential inconsistencies or errors” before sending off that data to the New York Times “and other customers about every one to three minutes.”

According to Moseder, this Edison Research Center entity at the center of much of this vote tallying where election results are handed off to the media presents enormous vulnerabilities if Edison bore “a nefarious agenda” in their reported results.

“So Edison Research is a massive agency used across all 50 states, they have 4000 people on the ground, reporting this back to Edison, and that Edison feed goes to the New York Times and all the media outlets. And so think for a second about all the centralized control that this one agency has over elections. If Edison had a nefarious agenda, that would be a really, really big problem, don’t you think?”

Moseder cut away to a video from Jeff O’Donnell, who exposed the bizarre fluctuation of votes out of Chester County, Pennsylvania, during the live results reporting from the 2020 election, telling viewers “to keep in the back of your mind, the fact that vote totals are not supposed to go down at all.”

After sharing a portion of the above-featured video, Moseder claimed, “there’s multiple videos like this and more will be coming in the near future. Jeff O’Donnell says wait till you see Fulton County – so apparently that one’s really bad. And that’s on the way.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.